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Category: Technical

Shiny Pokemon and iPhone screen recording

Shiny Pokemon and iPhone screen recording

I was fooling around with Pokemon Go and ended up getting a very rare shiny Magikarp. I also wanted to know how hard it was to record the iPhone screen and the sound. There are lots of different ways from both PC and Mac, but I used my Mac Mini and it was very easy:

  1. Connect your iPhone or iPad to your Mac via the lightning cable.
  2. Open QuickTime player.
  3. Click File then select ‘New Movie Recording’
  4. A recording window will appear (with you in it, most likely). …
  5. Select the Mic of your iPhone if you want to record music/sound effects.
  6. Click the Record button.

So, I recorded the evolution from the rare shiny Magikarp to the rare shiny Gyarados. Results were very good:

YOLO!

YOLO!

YOLO¬†is a real-time object detection system. On a Titan X it processes images at 40-90 FPS, and it has a pretty nifty demo reel too. ūüôā

Mixed Reality Room

Mixed Reality Room

THIS is compelling. No bulky headsets/goggles/etc.

Using projection mapping and a mix of tracking systems, creative studio¬†TH√ČORIZ¬†shows off a slick prototype which projects 3D images that dynamically adapt to movements. Everything you see was captured live, with no post-production.

Gradient Descent using Flocking algorithms

Gradient Descent using Flocking algorithms

One of the key mathematical foundations of machine learning is using gradient descent to find maxima and minima in a multi-dimensional data set. Gradient descent is good, but getting the most out of it can sometimes leave you wringing your hands or doing a lot of painful mathematical investigation and analysis. Investigations that can quickly tax even a mathematics major.

Sergui¬†Puscas shows us a different, more intuitive way to find maxima and minima by using swarming and flocking techniques. It’s a pretty fun read.

Those Cool Open Office Spaces are bad for employees

Those Cool Open Office Spaces are bad for employees

From Inc Magazine that is citing the most comprehensive studies done. But this shouldn’t be a shock, many of these studies were done in the 1950’s and came to the exact same conclusions.

And all this after Indie developers are learning to throw out working all the time in favor of actual office hours too. Turns out those ‘big old companies’ are all being proven right. After all, they got the way they are – big, old and profitable – by researching and using the best-known methods.

From the article:

There have been numerous studies showing that open-plan offices are both a productivity disaster and a false economy. (The productivity drain more than offsets the savings in square footage.) There are even some videos showing how wretched (and in some cases ridiculous) these environments truly are.

Well, just in case you weren’t yet convinced, here’s some new evidence from a study of more than 40,000 workers in 300 U.S. office buildings–by far the most comprehensive research on this issue. The results, published in the Journal of Environmental Psychology, came to the following conclusion:

“Enclosed private offices clearly outperformed open-plan layouts in most aspects of IEQ (Indoor Environmental Quality), particularly in acoustics, privacy and the proxemics issues. Benefits of enhanced ‘ease of interaction’ were smaller than the penalties of increased noise level and decreased privacy resulting from open-plan office configuration.”

Don’t let the jargon confuse you. The term “proxemics issues” refers to how people feel uncomfortable when they’re forced into close proximity with other people. To be perfectly clear, here’s what the paragraph says: “Open-plan offices aren’t worth it.”

BTW, it isn’t just the noise and the interruptions that cause people to hate open-plan offices. According to a recent Wall Street Journal article:

“All of this social engineering has created endless distractions that draw employees’ eyes away from their own screens. Visual noise, the activity or movement around the edges of an employee’s field of vision, can erode concentration and disrupt analytical thinking or creativity.”

Unlike noise pollution, which can be remedied with a pair of headsets, there’s no way to block out the visual pollution, short of throwing a towel over your head and screen like a toddler’s play tent.