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Month: July 2016

Paul Gerard’s 10 great conditioning hikes near Portland

Paul Gerard’s 10 great conditioning hikes near Portland

Hike Yourself Into Shape: 10 Conditioning Hikes Near Portland

Paul Gerald makes a great list of hikes designed to get you back in shape. I agree with this list whole-heartedly, but they do ramp up in difficulty very quickly. You might want to do some of these hikes (or find one of similar distance/elevation gain) more than once before moving up to the next level of difficulty. Also, hikes like the Elk-King traverse and Table mountain can be technically difficult and have exposure/very real falling dangers. So, definitely do your homework before going.

Here’s the abbreviated list:

  1. Angel’s Rest – Distance: 4.6 miles. Elevation Gain: 1,600’
  2. Hamilton Mountain – Distance: 7.6 miles. Elevation Gain: 2,100’
  3. Devil’s Rest via Wahkeena – Distance: 7.4 miles. Elevation Gain: 2,400’
  4. Nick Eaton Way – Distance: 8 miles Elevation Gain: 2,600’
  5. Dog Mountain – Distance: 7.2 miles. Elevation Gain: 2,900’
  6. Trapper Creek Loop – Distance: 13.3 miles. Elevation Gain: 3,200’
  7. Table Mountain – Distance: 10 miles. Elevation Gain: 3,650’
  8. Elk-King Traverse – Distance: 11 miles. Elevation Gain: 4,600’
  9. Tanner Butte – Distance: 18 miles. Elevation Gain: 4,450’
  10. Mount Defiance – Distance: 11.9 miles. Elevation Gain: 4,800’
75 of the Best Day Hikes in Oregon

75 of the Best Day Hikes in Oregon

Outdoor Project’s list of Oregon’s 75 Best Day Hikes.

This is a good list of the hikes in Oregon. Having done a number of these, I agree with many of these. While the Columbia Gorge list does not include the Washington side hikes like Dog Mountain, Hamilton Mountain, or Table Mountain, Coyote Wall, etc, at very least it makes a great starting point for Oregon-side trails.

Note that a number of these hikes are not for beginners or novices. Be sure to google the details before you go.

Oregon Coast + Coast Range

  1. Cape Lookout Hike
  2. Cape Falcon Hike
  3. Tillamook Head Hike
  4. Drift Creek Falls Hike
  5. Neahkahnie Mountain
  6. Cascade Head
  7. Saddle Mountain
  8. Kentucky Falls Hike
  9. Port Orford Heads Trails
  10. Golden + Silver Falls

Columbia River Gorge

  1. Multnomah Falls/Wahkeena Falls Loop
  2. Oneonta Gorge
  3. Horsetail + Ponytail Falls Hike
  4. Eagle Creek Hike
  5. Munra Point
  6. Tom McCall Point
  7. Indian Point Hike
  8. Deschutes River, Ferry Springs Hike
  9. Chinidere Mountain + Wahtum Lake Hike
  10. Elowah Falls Hike

Mount Hood/Clackamas River Area

  1. McNeil Point Hike
  2. Paradise Park, Mount Hood
  3. Clackamas + Memaloose Falls Hike
  4. Tamanawas Falls
  5. Salmon River, Old Trail
  6. Bald Butte
  7. Ramona Falls Hike
  8. Clackamas River Trail
  9. Gnarl Ridge Hike
  10. Cooper Spur + Cloud Cap Hike

Mount Jefferson + Metolius River Area

  1. Jefferson Park
  2. Canyon Creek Meadows
  3. Pamelia Lake + Grizzly Peak
  4. Metolius River Trail
  5. Black Butte Trail

Willamette Valley + Foothills

  1. Opal Creek Hike
  2. Abiqua Falls Hike
  3. Silver Falls, Trail of 10 Falls
  4. Butte Creek Falls Hike
  5. Spencer Butte Hike
  6. Proxy Falls Hike
  7. Diamond Creek Falls
  8. Triangulation Peak + Boca Cave
  9. McKenzie River Trail
  10. Brice Creek Trail

Central Oregon

  1. Green Lakes Hike
  2. Tumalo Falls + Creek Hike
  3. Arnold Ice Cave
  4. Broken Top Crater
  5. Lava River Cave
  6. Paulina Lake Loop Trail + Hot Springs
  7. Deschutes River Trail, Upper Reach
  8. Tam McArthur Rim
  9. Steelhead Falls
  10. Waldo Lake + Rigdon Lakes Hike
  11. Paulina Peak
  12. Smith Rock Misery Ridge
  13. Sparks Lake, Ray Adkeson Memorial Trail

Southern Oregon

  1. Diamond Peak, Marie + Rockpile Lakes
  2. Rogue River Trail
  3. Moon Falls
  4. Crater Lake, Mount Scott
  5. Crater Lake, Garfield Peak
  6. Crater Lake Plaikni Falls Trail
  7. Indigo Lake Trail
  8. Grizzly Peak
  9. Mount McLoughlin
  10. Lower Table Rock

Eastern Oregon

  1. Lookout Mountain + Mother Lode Mine
  2. Strawberry Mountain via Strawberry Lake
  3. Slide Lake via High Lake
  4. Little Strawberry Hike
  5. Pike Creek Mine Hike
  6. Borax Lake + Borax Lake Hot Springs
  7. Aneroid Lake
3D movies without the glasses

3D movies without the glasses

MIT made a movie screen that brings 3D to all seats – without the glasses

MIT set out to create a display that lets people see the 3D effect in a movie theater, from any seat in the house – no glasses required. Teaming up with Israel’s Weiszmann Institute of Science, CSAIL managed to put together a prototype called ‘Cinema 3D’ that uses a complex arrangement of lenses and mirrors to create a set number of parallax barriers (think of Venetian blinds that show a slightly different set of pixels to each of the viewer’s eyes to simulate depth) that can address every viewing angle in the theater based on seat locations.

 

Police possibly 3D printing murder victim’s fingerprint to unlock their phone

Police possibly 3D printing murder victim’s fingerprint to unlock their phone

Police in Michigan have a new tool for unlocking phones: 3D printing. According to a new report from Flash Forward creator Rose Eveleth, law enforcement officers approached a professor at Michigan State earlier this year to reproduce a murder victim’s fingerprint from a prerecorded scan. Once created, the 3D model would be used to create a false fingerprint, which could be used to unlock the phone.

http://www.theverge.com/2016/7/21/12247370/police-fingerprint-3D-printing-unlock-phone-murder

History tells us what may happen next

History tells us what may happen next

We are in unprecidented times. Trump is running for presidency on a platform unlike any other in modern history. The Democratic party is in shambles. Putin has rattled sabers with small invasions of neighboring countries. ISIS is spreading terror into Europe. Brexit vote passed despite being predicted to fail. We sit on the precipice of…something very different.

An excellent read by a historian looking at our current situation.

 

View story at Medium.com

Mounting a Windows hosted samba share from Linux (Fedora/Ubuntu/etc) – with a domain account

Mounting a Windows hosted samba share from Linux (Fedora/Ubuntu/etc) – with a domain account

Samba shares can be finicky beasts. Mounting a samba (smb) point shared from a Windows host doubly tricky at times due to cross-platform differences such as domains.

If you ever find yourself trying to mount a Windows hosted Samba share and need to log in with a domain account, here’s the format:

sudo mount -t cifs -o domain=<YOURDOMAIN>,username=<YOURUSERNAME>,password=<YOURPASSWORD> //<HOSTNAME>/TestShare /mnt/

This mounts <hostname> which can be either an ip address or host name to the directory /mnt/ when using the proper domain, username and password. Whew.

You can also test your connection by using smbclient, which seems to have a more forgiving syntax.:

smbclient //<HOSTNAME>/TestShare -U <YOURDOMAIN>/<YOURUSERNAME>
ex:
smbclient //myhost.com/TestShare -U ibmdom/billwaters

This would connect you to myhost.com/Testshare directory using the user account billwaters that is part of the ibmdom domain. It would then prompt you for your password. You can also optionally add the password to the command line, but this allows you to type it in separately.