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Month: September 2018

How easy it is to make anyone say anything now

How easy it is to make anyone say anything now

More proof that seeing is NOT believing.

I’ve posted numerous research papers that show how easy it is to make videos do what you’d like. How to take snippets of voices and make people say whatever you’d like. We can even now make people do dances on video they can’t do in real life. How easy is this to do? Deep fakes are shockingly easy as it turns out and only needs a few savy folks to make one.

Here’s the latest example where former US president Obama is made to say whatever the actor behind them wants.

My stay at Gold Butte Fire Watchtower

My stay at Gold Butte Fire Watchtower

Here’s a little video clip from the afternoon that turned really windy. View was very obstructed due to all the smoke from wildfires. Air quality was actually listed as hazardous – so I didn’t get out much this day.

Getting dressed in the 1700’s

Getting dressed in the 1700’s

What a great series!

The National Museums Liverpool has some great videos. One set of them involved getting dressed in 18th century garb. We’ve all seen period movies. Now you can see how actors, and the original nobelmen/women of that era dressed.

Here’s what men wore and how they dressed:

Now, if you thought getting dressed as a 18th century gentleman was complex. Try being a 18th century lady. Bonus points for explaining the old nursery rhyme ‘Lucy Locket lost her pocket’, but others suggest it had a more tawdry meaning.

Your first game

Your first game

Time for me to shake my fist and tell you darn kids to get off my lawn. Lets set the wayback machine to the 1980’s…

Ralph Koster shares the first video game he ever wrote as well as a great flashback to what almost everyone that wanted to learn to program did back in the 80’s and 90’s. We typed in long programs by hand from books we got at the library and computer magazines. We taught ourselves BASIC and smatterings of assembly. If you were really cool, you even tried to sell your games: which was done by copying them to a floppy, printing a dot-matrix label for it, and trying to sell it in a ziplock baggie.

I started by fiddling around with the programs I typed in to see if I could change them or make them do different things.

My very first video ‘game’ on my TSR-80 consisted of a bunch of black and white dots that would fall down from the top of the screen, and you moved your dot ‘ship’ back and forth to avoid them as the enemies rained down. They came down one at a time. Ridiculously slowly. But it was probably my very first ‘game’.

My second, more ‘real’ game was a castle adventure game. You were the sole heir of a long-lost uncle and had to search his castle to find the deed within 24 hours. It was a text adventure at its heart, but there was opening graphics. I even wrote my own graphics editor with which I drew those opening screens. I believe I still have the graph paper I used.

Anyway, for anyone who learned to program in the 80’s, Koster’s video will tug some familiar heartstrings. For you younger kids, this is how it was done back in the day…